A Selection of Trams, Streetcars & Light Rail Vehicles

Australia

An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Adelaide 1929 H class trams operating singly and in multiple-unit.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Melbourne tram calls at a tram stop along Victoria Parade. Historic Melbourne 'toastrack' tram at its St Kilda terminus with the driver swinging the trolleypole from one end of the vehicle to the other, so that it is at the back relative to direction of travel. 'Toastrack' trams are so called because of the full-width crossbench seats which can only be reached from the vehicle sides.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Melbourne Melbourne

Canada & USA

An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Two San Francisco cablecars.
Look carefully and you will notice that they are different! The one on the left operates on the California Street service, this vehicle is double-ended (can be driven from either end) and at the termini uses simple 'stub-ends' to reverse direction; the other type of vehicle operates on the Powel - Mason / Hyde routes, and must use a turntable to turn round.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
The real meets the pastiche! A real San Francisco Cable Car and a rubber tyred replica meet. This image was taken using a 'stretch' or 'panoramic' camera which explains the wide but narrow format.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
A section of street trackage showing slotted third (centre) rail through which a device attached to a cablecar grips onto the moving cable. Older Boeing and newer Breda streetcars in San Francisco.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
PCC type streetcar in Los Angeles Railway livery on route F plus some trolleybuses (New Flyer, I think) in San Francisco. Although this San Francisco liveried PCC streetcar shows an F destination it was on a depot journey travelling towards the F route.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Dallas, USA, DART (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) train in the city centre. The McKinney Avenue historic streetcar, Dallas.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
When introduced in the 1930's the American PCC Streetcar was a significant advance on anything that had been produced before. These images come from Toronto, Canada.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Toronto, Canada. The two sides of the articulated Canadian Light Rail Vehicles (CLRV).
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
A Calgary, Canada C-Train calls at a 'high-level' platform in the city centre Transit Zone where travel is free. Like some other cities, Calgary varies train lengths according to time of day and expected passenger demand.
This image shows a single unit in the Transit Zone on a dull, wet, Sunday morning.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
A two / twin unit train. A three / triple unit train.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
MAX Light Rail vehicle in Portland, Oregon, USA.

Europe

An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Two Basle, Switzerland, special tram trailers. Basle used to have several of these vehicles, which did carry passengers(!) They usually operated on Monday - Friday peak and Saturday shopping hours services. 'Novelty' vehicles such as these add colour and interest to the local street scene. After being withdrawn from service the piggy tram (which locally was known as Säulitram) was sold to the Stuttgart, Germany Schweinemuseum.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Two more Basle 'specials'!
Left: All-over advertising tram trailer, complete with larger than life bottle (at the back).
Right: Specially decorated trams to celebrate the local football (soccer) team's 100th anniversary.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Even more Basle: Historic motor + trailer trams.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Different types of inter-urban trams in Basle.
The yellow tram is at a tram stop located in the middle of the road; for added passenger / pedestrian safety traffic signals stop the traffic as the tram arrives.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Karlsruhe, Germany. perfected the concept of using light rail vehicles on mainline railway tracks and now has a large network of such services.
Above: Earlier in the project some single voltage trams were extended along a little used goods line and then (as a tramway) through the centre of a small village.
Below: Later in the project dual voltage trams (750v dc and 15,000v ac) commenced operating. On one route they experienced a 500% increase in passenger numbers, with overcrowding becoming an issue.
More about this can be found at this page.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Innsbruck, Austria; a single track inter-urban light rail line to Igls. Oslo, Norway.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Stuttgart, Germany, is a hilly city and route 10 of its Light Rail system features the 'rack and pinion' principle as is often used by mountain railways. Attached to each passenger vehicle is a cycle carrier, and here we see cycles being unloaded at the Degerloch stop, which is the upper terminus of the line. 7000 class Light Rail Vehicle in Turin, Italy. Note the extending step just below the open doorways; somehow I think our health and safety people would not been keen on them because at stops they shoot out very quickly - and woe betide anyone standing too close. European safety standards are generally lower than ours.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Lille, France. St Etienne, France.
When I took this photograph St. Etienne's trams were still using trolleypoles. However they have now changed over to pantographs.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Most trams are electrically operated, however in Belgium the Vicinal (a secondary national Light Rail system) also used steam and later diesel trams on many of its cross-country services. Almost all of these services have now closed, but a few diesel trams still exist at what amounts to a living museum in the Ardennes village of Han-Sur-Lesse, where they carry tourists to the local caves which after a walking tour they exit by battery operated boat. To reduce harmful air pollution in 2014 the diesel trams started being converted to battery-electric propulsion.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Light rail in Utrecht, Holland. Mannheim, Germany.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Gent, Belgium.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
The pedestrian zone in Zürich, Switzerland.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Helsinki, Finland. Turin, Italy.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
A narrow street in Turin where the physical presence of the transport aids traffic flow by ensuring that at least one lane (in each direction) always remains clear. Trackwork in Turin does not have to mean the cessation of services.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
For a while Essen, Germany also ran self-steering O-Bahn (kerb guided buses) through part of its underground tramway system. To protect air quality the buses were electrically powered as trolleybuses. This was done as part of a Federal government funded project which because of German reunification closed early, leaving the project to flounder. Turin.
Pedestrian facilities at light rail / tram / streetcar crossing. Pedestrian facilities at light rail / tram / streetcar crossing.
A pedestrian crossing point across a light rail line located on a dual-carriageway median in Düsseldorf, Germany. For safety this crossing is fitted with wig-wag flashing lamps which advise passengers when a vehicle is coming (left) and a linked signal (a flashing white light) to give LRV drivers confidence that the pedestrian signals are working correctly (right).

projector icon A video showing some German Light Rail Pedestrian Crossing Safety Signals similar to these seen here in Düsseldorf plus variants from Manchester and Calgary, Canada, has been placed on the ‘YouTube’ film / video website and can be watched (in a new window) by clicking either the projector icon or here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M28tGs253NM



An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
An extra long (4 units) Düsseldorf Stadtbahn B type tram on the route to the exhibition centre which includes a section of street tramway. Trondheim, Norway
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Above: and Below: Stuttgart, Germany.
The station above-right where the LRV's open their doors on both sides is Pragsattel.
Many sections of the Stuttgart Stadtbahn (city railway) have three tracks, this comes from the slow upgrade program in which the metre-guage trams (as seen below-right) were phased out and replaced the standard guage rolling stock.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
PCC Derivative, The Hague, Netherlands. Riga, Latvia.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
TFS trams in Grenoble, France.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
TFS tram in Paris, France. An Amsterdam tram passes over a motorway.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Amsterdam, Holland.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Brussels Turin
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
(East) Berlin, Germany in 1990
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
(West) Berlin in 1990. Historic tramcar running on a section of U-Bahn that had been closed following the division of the city into two sections. The Schwebebahn (suspended monorail) in Wuppertal, Germany.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Strasbourg, France
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Lyon, France Nantes, France
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Two French cities use rubber tyred vehicles which are called trams but are also capable of detaching from the single guidance rail and operating as buses. These are Caen (left) and Nancy (right).
In Caen the vehicles are powered from one overhead wire and use the guidance rail for electrical return. When away from the track their electric motors are powered by an onboard diesel-electric power pack.
The Nancy vehicles operate as trolleybuses so although they also have diesel power packs they only use them when away from the overhead wire power supply.
More about what is called the TVR and its commercial rivals can be found at this page.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Bordeaux, France.
Left: The plants seen between the two tracks are vines!
Right: Much of the Bordeaux tramway is powered via a specially designed electric rail system called APS.
More about APS can be found at this link: APS Ground Power.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Basle, Switzerland.
Lawn tram track flanked by privet hedges, railings, a road and a narrow section of parkland. Hidden in the shade someone can be seen sitting on a park bench. This page also looks at lawn track - and more! Lawn Track - Creating Green Corridors.
An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams. An eclectic planetwide Potpourri of trams.
Zwickau, (south eastern) Germany, an alternative variant to lawn track sees the growing of low-level flowering plants around the tracks - in this instance the visual difference compared to the green of the turf helps delineate the swept path of the tramway. Kassel, (central) Germany, for locations where there is no alternative to visible overhead wire support poles a solution which reduces their visual effect would be to mask the poles by growing climbing evergreen plants over and trees around them.

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